Piotr Aszyk

Reception of some Aspects of the Hippocratic Medical Ethics in Antiquity

Article
12/2 - Fall 2007, pages 333–343
Date of online publication: 15 novembre 2007
Date of publication: 01 novembre 2007

Abstract

The Hellenic medical ideas have found appreciation among people over centuries. Though the initial concept remained the same, methods or ways to achieve desired aims have changed. Since Hippocrates, new generations of physicians have worked hard to find more powerful types of therapies to relieve their patients and make treatment less burdensome. The struggle of medicine is very specific and requires, apart from practical skills, a clear personal commitment to help people wisely. From the Early Antiquity, both medicine and medical ethics go together. Wherever Hippocratic medicine is practiced, an appropriate moral pattern accompanies it because the Hellenic doctor offered purely clinical data and his art should not be separated from anthropology, ethics and religion.

Keywords

Cite this article

Aszyk, Piotr. “Reception of some Aspects of the Hippocratic Medical Ethics in Antiquity.” Forum Philosophicum 12, no. 2 (2007): 333–343. doi:10.5840/forphil20071229.

Bibliography

Augustine of Hippo. “City of God.” In Select library of the Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church, vol. 2, St Augustin's City of God and Christian doctrine, edited by Philip Schaff. Buffalo: Christian Literature Company, 1890.

Carrick, Paul. Medical Ethics in the Ancient World. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press, 2001.

Celsus, Aulus Cornelius. De medicina. Vol. 1. Translated by Walter George Spencer. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1935.

Cicero, Marcus Tullius. Letters to Atticus. Vol. 3. Translated by Eric Otto Winstedt. New York: Macmillan, 1918.

Edelstein, Ludwig. “The Professional Ethics of The Greek Physician.” In Ancient Medicine: Selected Papers of Ludwig Edelstein, edited by Owsei Temkin and C. Lilian Temkin, translated by C. Lilian Temkin, 319–348. Baltimore: Hopkins, 1967.

Galen. On the natural faculties. Translated by Arthur John Brock. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1952. Accessed 2006. http://classics.mit.edu/Galen/natfac.html.

Hippocrates. Epidemics. In Hippocrates. Vol. 1, Ancient Medicine. Airs, Waters, Places. Epidemics 1 and 3. The Oath. Precepts. Nutriment, translated by William Henry Samuel Jones. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1972.

Hippocrates. The Art. In Hippocrates. Vol. 2, Prognostic. Regimen in Acute Diseases. The Sacred Disease. The Art. Breaths. Law. Decorum. Physician (Ch. 1). Dentition, translated by William Henry Samuel Jones. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1992.

Hippocrates. The Oath. In Hippocrates. Vol. 1, Ancient Medicine. Airs, Waters, Places. Epidemics 1 and 3. The Oath. Precepts. Nutriment, translated by William Henry Samuel Jones. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1995.

Hippocrates. Physician. In Hippocrates. Vol. 8, Places in Man. Glands. Fleshes. Prorrhetic I–II. Physician. Use of Liquids. Ulcers. Haemorrhoids and Fistulas, translated by Paul Potter. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1995.

Hippocrates. Aphorisms. In Hippocrates. Vol. 4, Nature of Man. Regimen in Health. Humours. Aphorisms. Regimen 1–3. Dreams, translated by William Henry Samuel Jones. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1998.

Isidore of Seville. Hispalensis Episcopi: Etymologiarum Sive Originum. Libri 20. Edited by Wallace Martin Lindsay. Oxonii: E Typographeo Clarendoniano; New York: Oxford University Press, 1911.

Isidore of Seville. “De medicine.” In The Medical Writings. Edited and translated by William D. Sharpe. Philadelphia, PA: American Philosophical Society, Independence Square, 1964.

Sharpe, William D. “Introduction.” In Isidore of Seville. The Medical Writings. Philadelphia, PA: American Philosophical Society, Independence Square, 1964.

Jonsen, Albert R. A Short History of Medical Ethics. New York: Oxford University Press, 2000.

Jouanna, Jacques. Hippocrates. Translated by M. B. DeBevoise. Baltimore, MD: John Hopkins University Press, 1999.

Migne, Jacques Paul, ed. Patrologiae Cursus Completus. Series Graeca. Accessed 2006. http://patristica.net/graeca/.

Philips, E. D. Aspects of Greek Medicine. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1973.

Porter, Roy. The Greatest Benefit to Mankind: A Medical History of Humanity. New York: Norton, 1999.

Pellegrino, Edmund D., and Alice A. Pellegrino. “Humanism and Ethics in Roman Medicine: Translation and Commentary on a Text of Scribonius Largus.” Literature and Medicine 7 (1988): 22–38. doi:10.1353/lm.2011.0164.

Quasten, Johannes. Patrology. Vol. 3, The Golden Age of Greek Patristic Literature, from the Council of Nicaea to the Council of Chalcedon. Westminster: Newman, 1960.

Rusch, William G. The Later Latin fathers. London: Duckworth, 1977.

Scribonius Largus. Scribonii Largi Compositiones. Edited by Sergio Sconocchia. Leipzig: Teubner, 1983.

Sigerist, Henry Ernest. A History of Medicine. Vol 2, Early Greek, Hindu, and Persian Medicine. New York: Oxford University Press, 1961.

Temkin, Owsei. Hippocrates in a World of Pagans and Christians. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1991.

Tixeront, Joseph. A Handbook of Patrology. Saint Louis: Herder, 1920.

Copyright

© Forum Philosophicum