Mikael Leidenhag

Is Panentheism Naturalistic?
How Panentheistic Conceptions of Divine Action Imply Dualism

Article
19/2 - Fall 2014, pages 209–225
Date of online publication: 28 mai 2015
Date of publication: 28 mai 2015

Abstract

This paper will argue that panentheism fails to avoid ontological dualism, and that the naturalistic assumption being employed in panentheism undermines the idea of God acting in physical reality. Moreover, given panentheism’s lack of success with respect to avoiding dualism, it becomes unclear to what extent panentheism represents a naturalistic approach in the dialogue between science and religion.

Keywords

Cite this article

Leidenhag, Mikael. “Is Panentheism Naturalistic? How Panentheistic Conceptions of Divine Action Imply Dualism.” Forum Philosophicum 19, no. 2 (2014): 209–225. doi:10.5840/forphil20141923.

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